Login
Undergraduate Graduate Online\Off-Campus Academic Calendar

Student Experiences

"I have to say that George Wythe helped me immensely in my preparation for law school."
-Kyle Nuttal, J.D.
See more alumni »

Earn Your Degree From Home

Learn about the GWU Off-Campus programs: Online Studies, Extension Courses and Statesmanship Seminars

Click Here

Master of Arts, Education

This program is closed to new applicants.

We are not currently accepting applications into the graduate program in Education. We are however, continuing to service existing graduate students.  Existing students who fail to enroll in classes for two or more consecutive years may reapply. Readmitted students are subject to the graduation requirements of their program at time of readmission, which has changed. Therefore previously earned credit may no longer count towards graduation.

 

The Master of Arts (M.A.), Education program is an intense study of the field of education, including educational theory, methodology, mentoring, curricula, and the overall societal and political atmosphere of education.  Recommended for professional educators: public, home, and private. 44 hours. Prerequisite: Bachelor's Degree.


Degree Requirements:

Candidates must complete 44 credits of graduate level coursework under the following requirements:

  1. Complete 36 credits of coursework related to the field of education. 
  2. Complete the Capstone through one of the following options: 
    • Thesis option: Complete an approved prospectus and thesis in a minimum of 8 credit hours.  See thesis guidelines here.
    • Coursework option: Complete the two 3-credit capstone courses and a 2-credit writing course for a total of 8 credit hours.
  3. Pass the Comprehensive Oral Defense of the degree and the thesis (candidates in the coursework option defend two major essays written during their degree program). 

 

ED6510 Capstone: Educational Philosophy, Culture and Policy (3 credits)

This course compares major approaches to home, public and private education from Ancient Greece to the present, the impacts on culture and society, and the politics surrounding education funding, functions and delivery. Additional attention is given to the public policy agendas and concerns arising from the beginning of the Progressive era to the present battles over Common Core, the special interests that shape education, pedagogies for particular outcomes, and the principle of parental choice and stewardship.

  • Jacques Barzun, Teacher in America
    • John Gatto, Dumbing Us Down
      • Christensen, Johnson and Horn, Disrupting Class
        • John Dewey, Experience and Education
          • Allan Bloom, Closing the American Mind
            • E. D. Hirsch Jr., The Schools We Need, and Why We Donít Have Them
              • C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man
                • Terry M. Moe, Special Interest: Teachers Unions and Americaís Public Schools
                  • ST4530 Reading Packet

                    ED6520 Capstone: Authentic Leadership and Effective Communication (3 credits)

                    This course establishes the premise that habits of humility and sincerity are basic requirements for honest inquiry in a mature pursuit of truth and understanding. It enriches this foundation of authenticity with guidance and tools for understanding the best and worst of human nature, safeguards against corruption, plus additional verbal and non-verbal communication principles for effective persuasion as a messenger of the virtues and truths learned in a classical liberal arts education. Emphasis is also placed on considering our audiences, especially when very different from ourselves, and the habits and tools for evaluating our own blind spots, echo chambers and biases. Students examine principles of human nature and how to apply this knowledge in values-based public and media relations, exploring how to become more grounded and effective leaders for virtuous causes. In this course students ultimately learn how the virtues of the liberal arts are best applied in the real world of leadership; that genuine inquiry requires sincere a heart; and that such an intellectual pursuit must be grounded in a humble foundation, especially if one hopes to be of lasting influence for good.


                      ED6530 Moral Reasoning: Libertarian, Conservative & Progressive Tho (3 credits)

                      This course investigates the moral rationale and underpinnings of Libertarian, Conservative and Progressive thought through the writings of representative thought leaders and defenders. By comparing both their obvious and subtle nuances, the implications for humanity and agendas for education are further explored.


                        ED6190 Thesis Prospectus I (2 credits)

                        After roughly one-third of required coursework is complete, candidates will begin planning their Thesis. In this course, candidates are mentored in the process of choosing their thesis topic, and determining initial steps in the ultimate completion of the thesis portion of this degree.


                          ED6310 Thesis I (3 credits)

                          Upon completion and acceptance of the prospectus, candidates will engage in focused research on the thesis topic of their choosing. They will gather data, and other information that will help them make their case in the final thesis.


                            ED6320 Thesis II (3 credits)

                            In this course, candidates continue to gather information related to their thesis topics and begin writing in earnest. It is at this stage that the thesis committee becomes even more important in the process of preparing to complete and defend the thesis.


                              LA5014 Foundations of Inquiry & Influence; Roots of Liberal Arts (0 credits)

                              This is a combination of two courses. The first half of the course establishes the premise that habits of humility and sincerity are basic requirements for honest inquiry in a mature pursuit of truth and understanding. It enriches this foundation of authenticity with guidance and tools for understanding the best and worst of human nature, safeguards against corruption, plus additional verbal and non-verbal communication principles for effective persuasion as a messenger of the virtues and truths learned in a classical liberal arts education. Emphasis is also placed on considering one's audiences, especially when very different from ourselves, and the habits and tools for evaluating our own blind spots, echo chambers and biases. Students examine principles of human nature and how to apply this knowledge in values-based public and media relations, exploring how to become more grounded and effective leaders for virtuous causes. In this course students ultimately learn how the virtues of the liberal arts are best applied in the real world of leadership; that genuine inquiry requires sincere a heart; and that such an intellectual pursuit must be grounded in a foundation of humility, especially if one hopes to be of lasting influence for good. Building on this foundation, the rest of the course then compares major approaches to home, public and private education from to the present, the impacts on culture and society, and the politics surrounding education funding, functions and delivery. Additional attention is given to the public policy agendas and concerns arising from the beginning of the Progressive era to the present battles over Common Core, the special interests that shape education, pedagogies for particular outcomes, and the principle of parental choice and stewardship.


                                * An asterisk next to a course's credit hours indicates that this course may be "swapped" for elective or transfer credit. Click here for more information on elective and transfer credit.

                                Ask a Question

                                Have more questions?

                                Ask them here


                                Student Experiences

                                Hear from students why they chose to prepare for a life of statesmanship and how they enjoy their GWU experience.

                                Click Here

                                Copyright © 2002-2017 George Wythe University

                                Newsroom     |     Newsletter Archive     |     Ways to Give     |     Contact Us