Login
Undergraduate Online\Off-Campus Academic Calendar

Student Experiences

"I have to say that George Wythe helped me immensely in my preparation for law school."
-Kyle Nuttal, J.D.
See more alumni »

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
Constitutional Studies. 74 hours.

This program is closed to new applicants.

We are not currently accepting applications into the doctorate program. We are however, continuing to service existing doctoral candidates.  Existing students who fail to enroll in classes for two or more consecutive years must reapply once admissions is reopened. Readmitted students are subject to the graduation requirements of their program at time of readmission, which may have changed. Previously earned credit may no longer count towards graduation.

Quick Links:

The GWU Doctoral program offers an exceptional journey of depth into the classical liberal arts—where students pay the price to examine what the greatest statesmen in history have known by studying what they studied.

This degree is designed to introduce current and future leaders—CEOs, attorneys, professionals, government officials, senior executives, graduate students, scholars and others—to the greatest ideas in history concerning forms of government, economics, law, culture, and society.

It is a foregone conclusion that the challenges of the future will require new ideas and new actions, but the leaders who forge the society of the future will do better carrying the best of the past firmly in their minds and hearts.


Graduation Requirements

 

Credit hours
Coursework: Forms:      42 Credits
Coursework: Statesmanship:      16 Credits
Dissertation:      16 Credits
Total:      74 Credits

 


Curriculum

 

Phase 1: Forms
 
Semester 1 (8 credits)
  CL   9010   Western Political Philosophy I, A General Survey (2 credits)
  CL   9020   Western Political Philosophy II, Plato (2 credits)
  CL   9030   Western Political Philosophy III, Aristotle (2 credits)
  CL   9040   American Political Roots (2 credits)
 
Semester 2 (10 credits)
  CL   9110   Key American Documents (2 credits)
  CL   9120   Legal Foundations, Blackstone (2 credits)
  CL   9130   Constitutional Foundations I, Tucker & Colonial (2 credits)
  CL   9140   Constitutional Foundations II, Montesquieu (2 credits)
  CL   9190   Dissertation Prospectus I (2 credits)
 
Semester 3 (8 credits)
  CL   9200   Economic Foundations, Adam Smith(2 credits)
  CL   9210   The Spirit and Major Themes of the U.S. Constitution (2 credits)
  CL   9220   Detailed Analysis of Article 1 Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution (2 credits)
  CL   9230   Presidential Focus & Constitutionalism (2 credits)
 
Semester 4 (8 credits)
  CL   9310   Early American Political Writings (2 credits)
  CL   9320   Constitutional Forms I, Jefferson (2 credits)
  CL   9330   Constitutional Forms II, Adams (2 credits)
  CL   9340   Constitutional Forms III, Washington (2 credits)
 
Semester 5 (8 credits)
  CL   9410   Constitutional Forms IV, Madison (2 credits)
  CL   9420   Constitutional Forms V, Federalist & Anti-Federalist (2 credits)
  CL   9430   Democratic Forms I, Tocqueville (2 credits)
  CL   9440   Democratic Forms II, Bryce (2 credits)
 
Phase 2: Statesmanship
 
Semester 6 (8 credits)
  CL   9510   Critical Constitutional Cases I: Judicial Review (2 credits)
  CL   9520   Critical Constitutional Cases II: Federalism & State Powers (2 credits)
  CL   9530   Critical Constitutional Cases III: Legislative & Executive Powers (2 credits)
  CL   9540   Critical Constitutional Cases IV: Due Process & Equal Protection (2 credits)
 
Semester 7 (8 credits)
  CL   9610   Critical Constitutional Cases V: Freedom of Expression & Freedom of Religion (2 credits)
  CL   9620   Jurisprudence & Documents of World Governments (2 credits)
  CL   9630   International Constitutions (2 credits)
  CL   9640   Constitution Writing and Comprehensive Coursework Examination (2 credits)
 
Phase 3: Dissertation
 
Semester 8 (8 credits)
  CL   9700   Dissertation Prospectus II (2 credits)
  CL   9710   Dissertation I (3 credits)
  CL   9720   Dissertation II (3 credits)
 
Semester 9 (8 credits)
  CL   9810   Dissertation III (3 credits)
  CL   9820   Dissertation IV (3 credits)
  CL   9830   Oral Defense (2 credits)
 

 


CL9010 Western Political Philosophy I, A General Survey (2 credits)

Great political philosophers from Plato down through Locke not only challenged prevailing assumptions, they asked questions of humanity--causing those who heard them to stop and think. Even the political discussions of our day have roots in these and other great political philosophies. Knowing the arguments they used and the conclusions they adopted, will help prepare student to engage in meaningful discussions of the ways of man and his political nature.

  • Ebenstein, Great Political Thinkers

    CL9020 Western Political Philosophy II, Plato (2 credits)

    A new world, different from Eastern World traditions, evolved as civilization grew up in and around the Aegean. From the seemingly organic creation of the city-state, to the various leagues for trade and common defence during the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, questions of secular democracy, the proper role of government, and the separation of the State from Family and Community grew into a discussion that would last thousands of years and affect the lives and governments of untold people and nations. Plato and Aristotle set the stage for this discussion, and framed much of the vocabulary and basic ideas for what would become the great debate of western civilization.

    • Plato, The Republic
      • Plato, Dialogues (Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Meno, Symposium)

        CL9030 Western Political Philosophy III, Aristotle (2 credits)

        A new world, different from Eastern World traditions, evolved as civilization grew up in and around the Aegean. From the seemingly organic creation of the city-state, to the various leagues for trade and common defense during the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, questions of secular democracy, the proper role of government, and the separation of the State from Family and Community grew into a discussion that would last thousands of years and affect the lives and governments of untold people and nations. Plato and Aristotle set the stage for this discussion, and framed much of the vocabulary and basic ideas for what would become the great debate of western civilization.

        • Aristotle, The Nicomachean Ethics
          • Aristotle, Politics

            CL9040 American Political Roots (2 credits)

            History has too often been confused with the reciting of facts, timelines and the opinions of teachers. True education is discovery: being exposed to original sources and discovering, for yourself, strengths and weaknesses, truths and fallacies. This course gives students the opportunity to carefully read, annotate and analyze.

            • Russell Kirk, The Roots of American Order
              • Paul Johnson, A History of the American People
                • Alexander Solzhenitsyn, A World Split Apart

                  CL9110 Key American Documents (2 credits)

                  An intensive line-by-line analysis of the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble, the Constitution and Amendments I-XII. Emphasis on memorization and knowledge of detail. Doctoral Candidates will use Noah Webster's 1828 Dictionary to research every key word in these two documents.

                  • Declaration of Independence
                    • Also requires Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language (1828)
                  • Constitution of the United States

                    CL9120 Legal Foundations, Blackstone (2 credits)

                    The American legal tradition is, in many ways, based on English law as described by William Blackstone. In fact, it can be argued that there is no way to fully understand the American legal system without first understanding the ideas espoused in Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws.

                    • Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England, Introduction and Book 1 (of 4)

                      CL9130 Constitutional Foundations I, Tucker & Colonial Origins (2 credits)

                      In addition to reading the Scottish Enlightenment insights from George Tucker related specifically to constitutional forms, Doctoral candidates will read, annotate and diagram many of the earliest constitutions written in America during its colonial origins. By understanding how township and colonial constitutions were constructed, candidates will gain a greater understanding of why subsequent constitutions including the Virginia Constitution and the American Constitution were written the way they were. They will also marvel at both the religious and enlightenment philosophies that permeate, sometimes side-by-side, the earliest constitutions in America.

                      • George Tucker, A View of the United States Constitution
                        • Liberty Fund, Colonial Origins of the American Constitutions

                          CL9140 Constitutional Foundations II, Montesquieu (2 credits)

                          The Spirit of the Laws was quoted more often than any other work during the American Constitutional Convention. In this course, doctoral candidates will come to understand many of the fundamental and underlying roots of law, and man's desire to create order in a chaotic world. Montesquieu's exhaustive treatment of cultural and societal foundations of the law, as well as society's effect on the organic and changing nature of the law is deep, practical and relevant to those wishing to learn constitutional forms.

                          • Montesquieu, The Spirit of the Laws

                            CL9190 Dissertation Prospectus I (2 credits)

                            After roughly two semesters of required coursework is complete, candidates will begin planning their Dissertation. In this course, candidates are mentored in the process of choosing their Dissertation topic, and determining initial steps in the ultimate completion of the Dissertation portion of this degree. George Wythe University is a Classical Liberal Arts, Great Books School that focuses on Building Statesmen. More than just men and women of sound ability and character who promote liberty, they know that when the state is not working as it should, when liberty is diminished or destroyed, people cannot really live, they cannot be who they were created to be; they cannot seek happiness on their own terms. If the proper working of the state is to be had, if liberty is to remain, statesmen must engage in one or more of a variety of key sectors of society, including: business, industry, government, religion, community, media, education, and family. They see areas of society that are at least partially sick, and like a doctor of society, they seek to remedy those ills?using persuasion, not force. Masters and Doctoral candidates study the great books of yesterday and today; they study society as it was and is; they are expected to diagnose one or more societal ills, and offer prognoses and remedies that are compelling and arguably workable.


                              CL9200 Economic Foundations, Adam Smith (2 credits)

                              Until Adam Smith, political economy remained a part of general philosophy. But Smith, in essence, created modern economics and established the framework for the debate that would ensue between classical economics, Marxian economics and Keynesian economics to name a few key schools of thought. Without a proper understanding of Smith's premises, it is almost impossible to navigate the constitutional structures of modern nations. Smith's work continues to play an essential part in the study, not only of economics, but of international constitutional law.

                              • Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations
                                • Fredric Bastiat, What is Seen and What is Not Seen

                                  CL9210 The Spirit and Major Themes of the U.S. Constitution (2 credits)

                                  In the years leading up to American Independence and the creation of the U.S. Constitution, an amazing outpouring of ideas, debates, political argument, essays and sermons filled the newspapers, pamphlets, lecture halls and town halls of America. Ancient and contemporary authors were read and reread with an eye toward forging a new nation. Topics included the right to revolution, the nature of a republic, federal vs. consolidated government, separation of powers, property rights and a variety of other ideas including equality before the law, family governance and the need for religion as well as science. The spirit and major themes that permeated the founding period remain an important study for understanding the popular ingredients that go into forging a constitution.

                                  • Kurland & Lerner, The Founders' Constitution (Volume 1)

                                    CL9220 Detailed Analysis of Article 1 Section 8 of the U.S. Constit (2 credits)

                                    Candidates will closely analyze a single Section of the U.S. Constitution by reading many of the most important authors, framers and political philosophers who spoke specifically about each of the several clauses. An in-depth understanding of Article 1 Section 8 will also equip doctoral candidates with the skill necessary to look at other sections of any constitution with a keen and discerning eye.

                                    • Kurland & Lerner, The Founders' Constitution (Volumes 2-3)

                                      CL9230 Presidential Focus & Constitutionalism (2 credits)

                                      Candidates will read every Presidential Inaugural and Farewell Address with an eye to the way in which each President viewed the U.S. Constitution--its foundations, its application and its future. A look at speeches from Jefferson Davis will also offer insights into constitutional attitudes during the American era of sectionalism.

                                      • Inaugural and Farewell Addresses from U.S. Presidents
                                        • Other speeches on constitutional attitudes by famous Americans

                                          CL9310 Early American Political Writings (2 credits)

                                          A study of original writings of the founding era by the lesser known citizens of the period, including speeches, articles, letters and documents as compiled in the two-volume work by Lutz and Hyneman. Doctoral candidates will also research at least one original article, letter or speech for each year from 1755 to 1832 as found in volumes 2-5 of The Annals of America, by Britannica.

                                          • The Annals of America, by Brittanica
                                            • (selections through library research)
                                          • Lutz & Hyneman, American Political Writings During the Founding Era, volumes 1-2

                                            CL9320 Constitutional Forms I, Jefferson (2 credits)

                                            More than just the virtual author of the American Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson was a prolific and tireless advocate of limited government, strong democratic principles, local self-governments, the agrarian ideal, states rights, and a host of other principles he felt would keep American strong. He was almost prophetic in his ability to see where America could go wrong and move away from her founding principles. Likewise, Jefferson's insights into the constitutional forms of a strong society are not only deep, they are also surprisingly relevant to our own day.

                                            • Thomas Jefferson: Writings (Library of America)

                                              CL9330 Constitutional Forms II, Adams (2 credits)

                                              If it weren't for John Adams, it is arguable that American independence might never have left the debates in the chambers of Congress. Adams was a stalwart advocate for the United States of America. In addition to being one of the first to vocally oppose English rule, he was one of the most profound thinkers in the realm of political philosophy that could be found in America at the time. John Adams understood constitutional principles like few of his or our day, and his understanding is instructive to those who wish to grasp the spirit of the founding era and the fundamentals of constitutional government.

                                              • George W. Carey, The Political Writings of John Adams

                                                CL9340 Constitutional Forms III, Washington (2 credits)

                                                The indispensable man, George Washington played one of the most important roles in the formation of America and the unifying of the various states. Although Washington bemoaned his lack of education, he was nonetheless a well-read man and insightful advocate for a free America. His thoughts on principles related to constitutional forms are, like the man, indispensable to one seeking to understand the foundations of the modern republic.

                                                • W.B. Allen, George Washington: A Collection
                                                  • Jay Parry, The Real George Washington

                                                    CL9410 Constitutional Forms IV, Madison (2 credits)

                                                    James Madison has been referred to as the Father of the U.S. Constitution for more reasons than one. Primarily, it was he who fought to make the Philadelphia convention a success; it was he who convinced George Washington to attend; and it was he who documented more than any other participant the debates and discussions that took place during the summer convention of 1787. As one of the key architects of the Virgina Constitution, and subsequently the American Constitution, James Madison understood the forms that are required to bolster freedom and stem the constant pressure of tyranny and dependence.

                                                    • James Madison: Writings 1772-1836
                                                      • Edition: (Library of America

                                                    CL9420 Constitutional Forms V, Federalist & Anti-Federalist Papers (2 credits)

                                                    After the signing of the American Constitution, a ratification process began in earnest and the debates as to whether or not this constitution would be accepted by the people of the states were intense and divided. Three writers made a powerful case for the strength and efficacy of this new document. From expounding on the national character of the Americans to explaining each part of the Constitution in detail, the three authors that made up the pen name Publius worked diligently over the ensuing months to convince especially the larger states to accept the new government. This process leaves us with some of the most incredible ideas and arguments related to constitutions in general, and it is a must read for those seeking to fully comprehend constitutional forms. During the same time that the Federalist Papers were being written under the pen name of Publius, papers that would come to be known as Anti-Federalist papers began to emerge in newspapers across America. Many of the arguments made by these authors have surprisingly come to pass in our own day including a over-powerful President and a runaway Judiciary that would make laws instead of simply judge them. When read in close proximity with the Federalist Papers, the Anti-Federalist Papers offer important arguments that certainly strengthen ones understanding of the forms that underlie strong constitutions.

                                                    • Hamilton, Madison & Jay, The Federalist Papers
                                                      • Edition: Gideon edition
                                                    • The Anti-Federalist Papers
                                                      • Selections

                                                    CL9430 Democratic Forms I, Tocqueville (2 credits)

                                                    Many say that it wasn't until the presidency of Andrew Jackson that real democracy began to flourish in America. During Jackson's last term as President, a little-known aristocrat by the name of Alexis de Tocqueville came to America to study its prison systems. But he did much more than that. Tocqueville traveled through much of early America assessing this new democratic form. His perceptive eye and keen observations help any student of democratic forms understand more fully the benefits and dangers of democracy.

                                                    • Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Volumes I & II

                                                      CL9440 Democratic Forms II, Bryce (2 credits)

                                                      James Bryce takes students on a journey of discovery as he explores the grassroots formation of what would become the United States of America. From national and regional governmental forms, to the affect of public opinion, social institutions and the party system on the health of a nation, Bryce fully understands the American system and conveys that understanding eloquently and comprehensively in The American Commonwealth.

                                                      • James Bryce, The American Commonwealth

                                                        CL9510 Judicial Review (2 credits)

                                                        Beginning with Marbury v. Madison, the U.S. Supreme Court has decided whether and when executive, legislative and lower judicial officers have stepped outside the bounds of their constitutional authority. The Court has also delivered judicial opinions that expound on the scope and meaning of the constitutional clauses in question. This power of judicial review has powerfully shaped our modern constitutional understanding. This course examines the nature and merit of judicial review, possible alternatives, the Court?s authority to exercise judicial review and the procedural and substantive limits placed on that power by the Court?s own precedence and the express terms of the Constitution.

                                                        • Barron, Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Cases and Materials
                                                          • Selected cases and materials
                                                          • Edition: 7th ed.

                                                        CL9520 Federalism & State Powers (2 credits)

                                                        Federalism versus state powers is one of the defining power struggles in the U.S. Constitutional system; tension between the federal and state governments has been high since before the ratification of the Articles of Confederation and the struggle continues today. Today?s struggle revolves largely around the Commerce Clause and Dormant Commerce Clause, federal civil rights and the Tenth and Eleventh Amendments. This course examines the Supreme Court cases that have most influenced our constitutional understanding of each of these topics throughout our history.

                                                        • Barron, Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Cases and Materials
                                                          • Selected cases and materials
                                                          • Edition: 7th ed.

                                                        CL9530 Separation of Powers (2 credits)

                                                        The U.S. Constitution grants the federal executive and legislative branches specific powers and responsibilities. Some of these powers and responsibilities have been interpreted narrowly over time while others have scarcely been proscribed at all. At the heart of these interpretations?and at the heart of this course?are the fundamental questions, Which governmental functions are legislative at their core? Which are executive? In addition to examining the defining Supreme Court cases on these questions, this course will also examine those that cover the gray areas: the delegation of legislative authority in our administrative state and executive law making through executive orders.

                                                        • Barron, Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Cases and Materials
                                                          • Selected cases and materials
                                                          • Edition: 7th ed.

                                                        CL9540 Equal Protection & Due Process (2 credits)

                                                        Due Process and Equal Protection are perhaps the most influential civil rights clauses in our modern constitutional framework. Tucked into the Fourteenth Amendment, these clauses have become umbrellas for several new?or at least newly defined?rights or concepts such as privacy (including abortion and homosexual sodomy), government benefits and affirmative action. Proponents argue that these clauses must be interpreted broadly because they protect citizens in their most fundamental rights; critics argue they reflect mere interpretive gymnastics designed to promote a political agenda. The majority and dissenting opinions in this course set forth the most persuasive arguments on both sides of the issues and go to the very core of what it means to be governed by a federal constitution that protects civil liberties.

                                                        • Barron, Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Cases and Materials
                                                          • Selected cases and materials
                                                          • Edition: 7th ed.

                                                        CL9610 Critical Constitutional Cases V: Freedom of Expression & Fre (2 credits)

                                                        It has been argued that the First Amendment is first for a reason: no other rights matter in the absence of the freedom of religion and the freedom of speech. The freedom of religion is established by two constitutional clauses, the Free Exercise Clause and the No Establishment Clause. These clauses are designed to work hand in hand to ensure that the government neither infringes on nor establishes religion; but exactly how they are to be executed is an issue that has been unsettled and volatile from the beginning. Should the government?s general attitude be one of strict separation between church and state? Neutrality between church and state? Accomodation to religion in general but not to any specific religion? Each option has its own set of implications that are played out in the facts of the Supreme Court cases covered during this course. The freedom of speech is essential in any constitutional framework that places power in the hands of the people. However, questions arise when that power is abused. What limits should be tolerated on speech in the following instances: clear and present danger, fighting words and offensive speech, expression such as flag burning, publicly funded speech, obscenity and pornography? This course will cover some of the most influential and persuasive Supreme Court opinions on the freedom of speech and will help each participant gain a personal sense for where the lines should be drawn in their own constitutional understandings.

                                                        • Barron, Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Cases and Materials
                                                          • Selected cases and materials
                                                          • Edition: 7th ed.

                                                        CL9620 Jurisprudence & Documents of World Governments (2 credits)

                                                        Jurisprudence is the theory and philosophy of law. The goal of jurisprudence is to understand the theories that set forth the nature of law in general, the methods of legal reasoning and the procedures by which those methods are institutionalized into legal systems. The different theories of law undergird all judicial decisions and congressional legislation. The competing models arise in nearly every case or statute, many executive orders, some constitutions and even in the epistemologies of most participants. Yet few people are exposed to them. In this course we will discuss natural law (both ancient and modern versions), constructivism, positivism, consequentialism, and critical legal studies, as well as the results of each. This course is designed to help participants see the models at work in the cases and legislation they read, as well as in society all around. Most importantly, participants will learn to develop their own unique theory for the law and model for constitutional interpretation. The international documents include the Covenant of the League of Nations, Charter of the United Nations, Statute of the International Court of Justice, Bretton Woods Agreements, Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization, Earth Charter USA (2000), Charter of the Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

                                                        • White & Patterson, Introduction to the Philosophy of Law
                                                          • Jurisprudence and World Governments Readings Packet

                                                            CL9630 International Constitutions (2 credits)

                                                            Although the U.S. Constitution is the most influential case study in constitutional theory, many other influential constitutions and international documents have arisen throughout the world and throughout history. This course will include a sampling of constitutions from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, India, and North and South America. Special emphasis will be placed on comparing these constitutions to the U.S. Constitution, to each other, and to constitutions of the same nations but from earlier periods.

                                                            • International Constitutions Readings Packet

                                                              CL9640 Constitution Writing and Comprehensive Coursework Examinati (2 credits)

                                                              The fundamental purpose of the Jefferson Degree is not merely to help participants understand in detail the U.S. Constitution and how it has been interpreted through the years; nor is it solely to understand the constitutions of other nations and those found throughout history. The purpose of this degree is to steep participants in constitutional theory to such an extent that participants are prepared to write a constitution suited to the needs and mores of a given populace in a given locale. Thus, while the comprehensive examination provided in this course will require participants to demonstrate a detailed understanding of the historical development of the constitutional clauses studied in the case law sections, as well as of the international documents and world constitutions covered in their respective sections, much of each participant?s evaluation will revolve around their final project: the creation of a constitution. Each participant will be given a unique scenario detailing the basic history and needs of a specific group of people and will be expected to draft a working constitution for that group. Each clause in this constitution will be footnoted, and each footnote will contain annotations reflecting the thoughts of the philosophers and judges studied throughout the entire degree. Thus, throughout each of the courses of this degree, participants should carefully prepare annotations that are clear, concise and can easily be referenced for future use.


                                                                CL9700 Dissertation Prospectus II (2 credits)

                                                                After all required coursework is complete, candidates will take their Dissertation planning to the next step, working with their mentor to solidify their plan for the research and writing portions of the Dissertation requirement. Upon completion of this course, focused research and writing will then take place, until the Dissertation is completed and defended.


                                                                  CL9710 Dissertation I (3 credits)

                                                                  After the completion of all coursework and both prospectus courses, Doctoral candidates will officially begin research specific to their dissertation topic. This class is taken as independent study under the direction of your Doctoral Advisory Committee.


                                                                    CL9720 Dissertation II (3 credits)

                                                                    After completing the rigorous research phase in Dissertation I, candidates will begin writing in earnest and continue to research as they do. Two courses of three credit hours will be allocated to this phase. This class is taken as independent study under the direction of your Doctoral Advisory Committee.


                                                                      CL9810 Dissertation III (3 credits)

                                                                      After completing the rigorous research phase in Dissertation I, candidates will begin writing in earnest and continue to research as they do. Two courses of three credit hours will be allocated to this phase. This class is taken as independent study under the direction of your Doctoral Advisory Committee.


                                                                        CL9820 Dissertation IV (3 credits)

                                                                        The final Dissertation course is exclusively reserved for candidates to finish writing, editing and refining their Dissertation. This class is taken as independent study under the direction of your Doctoral Advisory Committee.


                                                                          CL9830 Oral Defense (2 credits)

                                                                          Candidates spend three credit hours preparing to defend their coursework and dissertation. The final action of this class is to take and pass your oral defense.


                                                                            * An asterisk next to a course's credit hours indicates that this course may be "swapped" for elective or transfer credit. Click here for more information on elective and transfer credit.

                                                                            Ask a Question

                                                                            Have more questions?

                                                                            Ask them here


                                                                            Earn Your Degree From Home

                                                                            Learn about the GWU Off-Campus programs: Online Studies, Extension Courses and Statesmanship Seminars

                                                                            Click Here

                                                                            Copyright © 2002-2014 George Wythe University

                                                                            Newsroom     |     Newsletter Archive     |     Ways to Give     |     Contact Us